Indian Culture & History

A sneak-peek into the Kaleidoscopic history of India!

  • Indian Culture & History

    The Jewish Cemetery in Chinchpokli, Mumbai

    Just outside the Chichpokli Railway Station in South Mumbai, there is a Jewish Cemetery built by Elias David Sassoon in 1878 in memory of his son Joseph who died in Shanghai in the 1860s. For the daily commuters on the Mumbai’s Central local line, the matching mausoleums that are seen from the Chinchpokli railway station are just landmarks that alert them about the next railway station.

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating India’s Intangible Heritages

    “India is my country and all Indians are my brothers and sisters. I love my country and I am proud of its rich and varied heritage. I shall always strive to be worthy of it….” We have been reciting this pledge for more than 10 years of our schooling. We have pledged our devotion to our country and to its rich and varied heritages. But what exactly are we striving to be worthy of? What is heritage? And further, what is cultural or intangible heritage?

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating the Colourful World of Indian Paintings

    India has always been a riot of colours. There will be very few countries as colourful as India. Each region, state, village, and street is animated with colours as if a collage from an art book! There are cities named after colours like Jaipur – The Pink City and Jodhpur – the Blue City of India, etc. Colours and their significance in our day to day life is much a part of our Indian consciousness. Their symbolism stands out and controls every aspect of life in India. These vibrant colours are a common thread that ties together the diversity of our country. This diversity was also evident in India’s art…

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating the Art of Writing and Calligraphy

    The written word has an impact far greater than that what is heard. It has a farther reach, can be authenticated easily and preserved in a better way than just in memory. Communication and transfer of knowledge, in Ancient India, was more popular through oral means. We have a reference in Chanakya Niti, where Chanakya says “Knowledge reduced down to the book, like loaned money, will be of no use in time of need.” However, as time progressed most of the things began to be written down in various texts and treatises, Chanakya Niti included. This art form has served multiple purposes since its inception including the duplication of religious…

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating the Oral Traditions of India

    The World Heritage Week that commenced from yesterday aims at spreading awareness about one’s culture and past. India, being one of the oldest civilisations in the world, has no shortage of history and heritage. Protecting and caring about monuments is relatively easy, but the protection and preservation of intangible heritage is hard. Our abstract ideas, ways of life, religion and traditions form a part of this intangible heritage. One such inseparable part of our “Indian-ness” is the ability to tell stories! We are the most dramatic and animated storytellers of the world. And this oral tradition of bringing alive a story is deeply embedded in our identity as an Indian.

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating World Heritage Week #1

    World Heritage Week, as declared by UNESCO, is celebrated around the world from 19th to 25th of November every year. In a way, we all celebrate our cultural heritage every day, simply by living our lives in a way that represents who we are and where we came from. But one day (18th of April: World Heritage Day) and one week (19th to 25Th November) is set aside each year to celebrate the history and heritage of the entire world.

  • Indian Culture & History

    Navratri: Veneration of the Primordial Feminine Principle

    India these last few days is alive with auspicious pujas and its the nights are vibrant with lights, music, and life! Navratri, the festival which is celebrated with such pomp and zest in India, is the festival that venerates various forms or avatars of the divine feminism which is the representation of positive celestial energy. Sharada Navratri, a nine-day long festival (Nav = Nine and Ratri = Nights), of which each day is dedicated to the worship of different forms of Shakti (the primordial feminine principle), is celebrated in the bright half of the Hindu calendar month Ashvin, which typically falls in the Gregorian months of September and October.

  • Indian Culture & History

    Deer? Rabbit? What do you see on the Moon?

    Have you ever looked up at the moon and seen a rabbit or a hare? For some reason I see something that resembles a Mickey-Mouse walking! Or perhaps Bugs Bunny – which is a rabbit per say but not the conventional one that the rest see…well, did you know there are many legends around the world about this rabbit that lives on the moon?

  • Indian Culture & History

    Celebrating the 69th Indian Republic Day

    India will be celebrating its 69th Republic Day tomorrow! So here’s a little something that I have written for my office website. Source: Celebrating the 69th Indian Republic Day I literally have 2 half-written blogs in my Drafts and another one that is slumbering on my laptop :/ I need to get writing!! Where can I find the will to do that? Do read the Republic day blog and give your feedback! © 2018 Ashwini Nawathe, Kaleidoscope of My Life All Rights Reserved